Ogne and Roehl, Transformissional Coaching

I bought Transformissional Coaching by Steve Ogne and Tim Roehl because Tim is someone I look up to. He’s a church planter, leader developer and works in the head office of my denomination. When talking to people I tell them he’s our Ed Stetzer. Which is extra funny, because I can use an SBC reference, which I rarely get to, and Stetzer wrote the foreword for this book. Anyways, after I bought this book I got an autographed copy through Darrell, so I gave my purchased copy away and read my autographed one.

Repeatedly I found myself shouting out loud, “YES, YES, YES! But why don’t people just GET IT!” Ogne and Roehl capture so much so perfectly that it made be so frustrated that this book isn’t being read and applied by every senior pastor in every church in the world. If the principles in this book were rightly applied I think the young pastors in churches today would experience far less frustration and better relationships with their senior leaders. I have no evidence to back this up, but I really do believe it.

The book contains a stellar examination of the current interactions between the church and the culture, some biblical support for coaching, information on the influences of personality styles when coaching individuals, how to coach teams and insightful considerations for coaching young postmodern leaders. This last chapter is worth the price of the book by itself, since most of the coaching that goes on is with younger leaders who tend to be more willing to self examine and grow.

If you are a leader I would encourage you to get this book – it will help you help others.

Here’s some of the quotes and thoughts that I had while reading:

9, “The North American church is in trouble because it has lost its purpose, its place, and its passion.”

11, referring to Robert Webber, “Younger Evangelicals are prone to deconstruct and reconstruct ministry.  They have an aversion to performance and programs in the church.  They prefer to emphasize the development of authentic Christian community.  They love to blend the ancient with the contemporary in their worship environments…they prefer an authentic spirituality in which the leader is a sojouner with them.”

13, “a transformissional approach to evangelism encourages people to belong to a community of faith before they beleive and then to come to faith as they expericne God through authentic relationships in the life of that community.”

17, referring to George Hunter, “One of the greatest injustices we do to our young people is to ask them to be conservative.  Christianity is not conservative, but revolutionary.  To be conservative today is to miss the whole point, for conservation means standing in the flow of the status quo, and the status quo no longer belongs to us…If we want to be fair, we must teach the young to be revolutionaries, revolutionaries agains the status quo.”

29, “Coaching paradigms that are overly focused on performance or productivity are particularly suspect and resisted by young and postmodern leaders, who highly value relationship, authenticity and community.”

36, “younger emerging leaders are more willing to admit and address these issues than those who have gone before them.  This is because they place a higher value on authenticity, and they have seen what has happened when these character issues where left unchallenged in previous generations of leaders.”

179, referring to Warren Wiersbe, “For nineteen centuries, the church has been telling the world to admit its sins, repent and believe the gospel.  Today…the world is telling the church to face up to her sins, repent, and start being the church of that gospel.”

216, “Young and postmodern leaders are looking for relationship, proximity, and affinity wiht those they allow to empower them.  They will receive coaching and mentoring from those they have relationships with; they will trust those who take time to invest in relationship…A coach who is interested only in ministry effectiveness will not relate well to young and postmodern leaders.”

217,  referring to Leonard Sweet, “Postmoderns will work their heads off, but they need certain assurances, (1) that you care, (2) that there’s something in it for them, and (3) that they can make work, play.”

pages read=272 ~ year to date=448 ~ 2009 goal=18,250 ~ (2%)

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2 thoughts on “Ogne and Roehl, Transformissional Coaching

  1. I like this: “11, referring to Robert Webber, “Younger Evangelicals are prone to deconstruct and reconstruct ministry. They have an aversion to performance and programs in the church. They prefer to emphasize the development of authentic Christian community. They love to blend the ancient with the contemporary in their worship environments…they prefer an authentic spirituality in which the leader is a sojouner with them.” I also liked a few other quotes too. But I absolutely love mixing “ancient” with “contemporary” like celebrating Ash Wednesday with an ash cross on your forehead. Or Lent, or prayer rituals done by benedictine monks. And I like the pastor not being “better” than everyone else. Leaders arent, Leaders are people who lead other people that respect them and listen to them. And having fellow church members you can trust with your problems and help support them in thiers like a community is what the church is all about. I hope you incorporate these things at “The Grove”. Im excited and looking forward to it. =)

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